Academic journal article The Journal of Southern History

Obituary

Academic journal article The Journal of Southern History

Obituary

Article excerpt

On September 8, 2007, preeminent Georgia historian Edward Joseph Cashin Jr. died while in Atlanta for research on his latest book. Born July 22, 1927, he graduated in 1945 from Boys Catholic High School in Augusta. After receiving a B.A. degree from Marist College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Fordham University, Ed began his academic career at Marist in 1963. Wishing, however, to return home, he accepted a faculty position at Augusta State University (then Augusta College) in 1969. He became chair of his department in 1975, a position he held until his retirement in 1996, when he became founding director of the Center for the Study of Georgia History. During his career he won each of the major awards given at the university, including Outstanding Faculty Member. He was an inspiring teacher to two generations of undergraduate students.

He was also a prolific scholar, remarkable at an institution with heavy teaching and administrative loads. His first five books in the 1970s and early 1980s focused on local history. By the late 1980s and 1990s he was exploring the influence of key figures in the colonial and Revolutionary South, which led to biographies of King's Ranger Thomas Brown (winner of the Fraunces Tavern Book Award of the American Revolution Round Table for best book on the American Revolution); Indian trader Lachlan McGillivray; Georgia royal governor Henry Ellis; and naturalist William Bartram. After completing Beloved Bethesda: A History of George Whitefield's Home for Boys, 1740-2000 (Macon, 2001), he returned to the examination of Augusta topics with his last four books (two in press). …

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