Academic journal article Journal of School Health

Smoking Status of Adolescents in 2 Countries and the Impact of the Smoking Status of Mother, Father, Grandparents, and Siblings

Academic journal article Journal of School Health

Smoking Status of Adolescents in 2 Countries and the Impact of the Smoking Status of Mother, Father, Grandparents, and Siblings

Article excerpt

There is considerable agreement throughout the world that adolescent smoking preferences are influenced by parents, grandparents, and siblings. (1,2) Learning about the influence of this modifiable family environmental factor is extremely important because prevention strategies focused on including relatives might lead to greater reductions in the incidence and prevalence of adolescent smoking than adolescent-only programs. Researchers have found that the effect of relatives on adolescent smoking preferences is variable among different cultures. However, there has been little opportunity to determine if smoking preferences differ between adolescents of a similar culture and heritage who live in 2 completely different geographic environments. The US-Mexico border is a place where adolescents share similar culture and heritage but are exposed to different laws, different finances, and different economic resources.

We recently conducted a study of adolescent smoking in the border area of El Paso, TX (population: 78% Hispanic, 64% Mexican) and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. While conducting this cross-sectional study, we assessed the influence of relative's (parents, grandparents, and siblings) smoking preferences on adolescent smoking.

A sample of US (1437, mean age = 14.0 years, SD = 1.5) and Mexican (2477, mean age = 14.5 years, SD = 1.4) adolescents representing different socioeconomic and geographic areas in the US-Mexico border area participated in a questionnaire based survey that included questions on relative's smoking preferences and a 7-level variable scale to measure adolescents' progress toward regular smoking. (3)

Never smokers were defined as persons who had never smoked a cigarette and had never tried smoking or experimented with smoking. All other adolescents were considered to have been smokers. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the effect of relatives on adolescent smoking preferences.

Adolescents in the United States were significantly more likely to be a smoker if 1 or both parents, grandparents, or siblings smoked, and after adjustment by gender and age, this effect was still statistically significant (Table 1). In the case of Mexico, the likelihood of adolescent smoking was strongly associated with a smoking mother, both parents smoking, grandparents smoking, or siblings smoking. After controlling for age and gender, this effect also remained highly significant.

The results demonstrate that in both the United States and Mexico, the odds ratios for likelihood of smoking have increased in adolescents whose relatives are smokers. However, a closer look at the findings reveals that some relatives may have a greater effect on adolescent smoking behaviors. For example, the effect on adolescent smoking behaviors from siblings smoking was much greater in the United States compared with Mexico. Moreover, the effect on adolescent smoking behaviors by the father was much greater in the United States compared with Mexico. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.