Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Marler Clark to Test Retail Hamburger for Non-O157:H7 Pathogenic Shiga Toxin-Producing E. Coli

Academic journal article Journal of Environmental Health

Marler Clark to Test Retail Hamburger for Non-O157:H7 Pathogenic Shiga Toxin-Producing E. Coli

Article excerpt

2007 was a record year for hamburger-related food safety recalls--over 20 individual recalls involving over 33 million pounds of meat. Because of growing concerns about the safety of the nation's ground beef supply, the law firm of Marler and Clark has commissioned a baseline study to determine the prevalence of non-O157:H7 pathogenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in retail ground beef.

Non-O157 STEC are capable of causing the same debilitating triad of diseases as E. coli O157:H7, including hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Infection with the non-O157 STEC can result in death in children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. According to CDC, the number of reported cases of illness caused by this group of pathogenic E. coli has been steadily increasing over the past several years. Despite this, Non-O157:H7 STEC is not considered an adulterant under current law in the United States.

Non-O157:H7 STEC are also known to occur in imported beef from several trading partners, however, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has not required imported beef to be free of these pathogens. FSIS also has not devised steps to measure and control the presence of these pathogens in domestic beef production at the slaughterhouse and in the supply at the grocery store. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.