Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Hate the Player, Not the Game: For New Technologies to Be Successfully Integrated into Schools, We Must First Fix the Users, Not the Tools

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Hate the Player, Not the Game: For New Technologies to Be Successfully Integrated into Schools, We Must First Fix the Users, Not the Tools

Article excerpt

I'VE NEVER BEEN QUITE ABLE to get behind the argument that guns don't kill people, people kill people. It seems to me that guns do the climactic work. Nevertheless, I do appreciate the premise: Blame the user, not the instrument. Or in today's parlance, hate the player, not the game.

Certainly that's true with technology.

My wife attends a community college, and she returns after virtually each class with stories of mind-blowing impudence: students thumping away at online games on their laptops; text messages arriving by way of a profane Eminem lyric; iPods dialed up loud enough for all the class to hear. The whole gamut of 21st-century technologies gets put to ill use, thwarting, instead of advancing, teaching and learning.

Sometimes I come home with a story of my own. There was the one time I was sitting with other parents in my child's classroom on Back to School Night as the teacher addressed us, when a cell phone went off inside a father's jacket pocket. I was all set to shoot the guy a blistering evil eye when he did something even crazier: He took the call! He didn't hustle outside, apologize on the way out and then again on the way back in, or ask sheepishly who raised him. He simply flipped open the phone and began talking. Minutes later, the cell phone jingled again, and--if I'm lyin' I'm dyin'--he took that call, too.

Well. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.