Academic journal article Current Musicology

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Current Musicology

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Current Musicology has long been committed to publishing scholarship that cuts across disciplinary, topical, and theoretical boundaries, contributing to an understanding of "musicology" that is intentionally broad. We are very pleased to continue that tradition with the current issue, which I believe highlights the vitality of cross-disciplinary approaches in the current state of our fields. William Gibbons examines Debussy's Trois Chansons de Bilitis, applying a literary theoretic account of readership to argue that many listeners may have been attentive to the work's musical narration of plot points from Pierre Louys's original poetic cycle. Kirsten Yri and John J. Sheinbaum both consider popular music topics in dialogue with historical musicology. Sheinbaum uses a theory of "periodization" normally applied to major classical composers to understand the dramatic changes in style and reception of progressive rock bands in the early 1980s. Yri examines the intersections between scholarly and popular approaches to medieval music, finding ideological links between recordings by the band Dead Can Dance and "historically informed" performances of early Western music. Jason Lee Oakes brings a historical perspective on the gendered constructions of abjection in punk rock to bear on his ethnographic account of a recently vital live-band karaoke scene in downtown New York City. …

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