Academic journal article International Advances in Economic Research

Regional Difference in the Shortage of Professional Nurses

Academic journal article International Advances in Economic Research

Regional Difference in the Shortage of Professional Nurses

Article excerpt

JEL I11. J21

The aging population combined with the slow growth in nursing graduates has created a nursing shortage throughout the country. In response, colleges have increased enrollment in nursing programs and employers have increased salaries. However, these efforts have not been enough to end the shortage. Using data from the Health Resources and Services Administration, this study evaluates the predicted shortage in 2010 by employing a nonparametric multiple comparison tests across different regions of the United States. The results show that the shortage will be most severe in the West/Southwest and the Northeast with an excess demand of 30%. The shortage is a more tempered 10% in the Midwest and Southeastern regions of the country. The lack of accredited baccalaureate programs in the West/Southwest is a main factor contributing to the shortage. For example, New Mexico, 36th in population and 5th in geographic size, has only two programs accredited by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. In comparison, Kansas, 33rd in population and 13th in size, has eleven accredited programs. In addition, Hispanics are a significant percent of the West and Southwest population and are less likely to choose nursing as a profession, further decreasing the supply of nurses. …

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