Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Article excerpt

Over the years, the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) has evolved from being a journal focused primarily on practice (when it was known as New Outlook for the Blind, from May 1951 to December 1976) to a peer-reviewed journal (JVIB, from January 1977 to the present) that presents data-based research with implications for practitioners as well as other readers. Through this evolution, the journal's constant goal has been to strike a balance between the two poles of the continuum of practice and research. Maintaining this balance requires input from our readers. At this time last year we asked you to complete a readers' survey that provided us with important insights into your experiences with and hopes for JVIB. After careful analysis of the findings and the invaluable information they provided, we have decided to explore in greater depth the observations of our readers, most especially readers who identify themselves as direct service providers. We will therefore be undertaking additional efforts to reach our readers through future conversations and some meetings as well--for example, at the upcoming international conference of the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AER) next month in Chicago. If you consider yourself a direct service provider, will be attending the AER conference in July 2008, and are willing to commit one hour of your time to a focus group, please e-mail me at . If you will not be attending the AER conference but would like to share your perspective with us, please let us know that as well. I will contact you with follow-up information.

This month's articles are particularly relevant to practitioners of a variety of disciplines. At this time of year, many families with children who are blind or visually impaired in the United States consider the pros and cons of sending their children to local or residential schools. In many states, public and residential schools both compete with and often compliment each other when parents of children with visual impairments are making school-placement decisions. …

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