Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The December Review

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The December Review

Article excerpt

In an economy with the size and complexity of the one in the United States, it is not surprising that workers employed in nontypical work schedules will be found. Using data from the Current Population Survey, Terence McMenamin finds that substantial shares of workers' schedules do not follow the traditional "9-to-5, Monday through Friday" mode. Through the use of flexible work schedules and alternate shifts, workers and their employers are striving to meet the scheduling demands of their specific industries. While the proportion of workers on alternate shifts has changed little in the last few years, the percentage with flexible schedules has risen sharply since the mid-1980s.

By overlaying employment data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages onto seismic hazard information provided by the California Geological Survey, Richard J. Holden, Donna Bahls, and Charles Real produce tabulations and maps that correlate estimated intensities of a possible serious earthquake in northern California with employment levels in the San Francisco Bay Area. The purpose is to assess potential business and economic losses from this form of a natural disaster. While the authors are continuing to refine their methodology, their article demonstrates the expanding possibilities that combined geocoded data sets can offer for analysis, planning, and risk management. …

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