Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Alternative Mechanism for PFOA? Trout Studies Shed Light on Liver Effects

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Alternative Mechanism for PFOA? Trout Studies Shed Light on Liver Effects

Article excerpt

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), used to make a class of industrial chemicals that are widely used in products such as textile coatings and flame retardants, is known to be a potent hepatocarcinogen in rodents. Until now the only mechanism of action for PFOA identified in rodent studies has been peroxisome proliferation, a well-characterized form of oxidative stress. Humans are reportedly insensitive to peroxisome proliferation; however, concerns remain that PFOA may cause adverse effects in people as well as in laboratory animals. Using rainbow trout as a model for chemically induced liver cancer in humans, a team of researchers suggest a new mechanism for the carcinogenicity of PFOA that does not involve peroxisome proliferation [EHP 116:1047-1055; Tilton et al.].

The investigators compared the hepatocarcinogenic potential of PFOA against the structurally diverse peroxisome proliferators cloribrate (CLOF) and dehydro-epiandrosterone (DHEA), identifying mechanisms of carcinogenesis from hepatic gene expression profiles phenotypically anchored to tumor outcome. Trout were fed PFOA in the diet for 30 weeks for tumor analysis. The investigators subsequently examined gene expression by cDNA array in animals fed PFOA, DHEA, CHOF, or 17[beta]-estradiol ([E. …

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