Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis: Vol. 53, No. 3, November 2008

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis: Vol. 53, No. 3, November 2008

Article excerpt

Aristotle's "So-Called Elements," TIMOTHY J. CROWLEY

Aristotle's use of the phrase [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is usually taken as evidence that he does not really think that the things to which this phrase refers, namely, fire, air, water, and earth, are genuine elements. In this paper the author questions the linguistic and textual grounds for taking the phrase [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in this way. The author offers a detailed examination of the significance of the phrase, and in particular he compares Aristotle's general use of the Greek participle [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in other contexts. He concludes that Aristotle's use of the phrase [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] does not carry ironical or skeptical connotations, and that it ought to be understood as a neutral report of a contemporary opinion that the elements of bodies are fire, air, water, and earth. The author leaves aside the question as to whether or not Aristotle himself endorses this opinion.

Aristotle on Natural Slavery, MALCOLM HEATH

Aristotle's claim that natural slaves do not possess autonomous rationality (Politics 1.5.1254b20-3) cannot plausibly be interpreted in an unrestricted sense, since this would conflict with what Aristotle knew about non-Greek societies. Aristotle's argument requires only a lack of autonomous practical rationality. An impairment of the capacity for integrated practical deliberation, resulting from an environmentally induced excess or deficiency in thumos (Politics 7. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.