Academic journal article Science and Children

Cow Power

Academic journal article Science and Children

Cow Power

Article excerpt

Converting livestock manure into a domestic renewable fuel source could generate enough electricity to meet up to three percent of North America's entire consumption needs and lead to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), according to research published Thursday, July 24 in the Institute of Physics' Environmental Research Letters.

The journal paper, "Cow Power: The Energy and Emissions Benefits of Converting Manure to Biogas," has implications for all countries with livestock as it is the first attempt to outline a procedure for quantifying the national amount of renewable energy that herds of cattle and other livestock can generate and the associated GHG emission reductions.

Livestock manure, left to decompose naturally, emits two particularly potent GHGs--nitrous oxide and methane. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, nitrous oxide warms the atmosphere 310 times more than carbon dioxide, and methane does so 21 times more.

The journal paper creates two hypothetical scenarios and quantifies them to compare energy savings and GHG reducing benefits. The first is "business as usual" with coal burnt for energy and with manure left to decompose naturally. In the second one, manure is anaerobically digested to create biogas and then burnt to offset coal.

Through anaerobic digestion, similar to the process by which you create compost, manure can be turned into energy-rich biogas, which standard microturbines can use to produce electricity. …

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