Academic journal article The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

Suicide Rates in Taiwan

Academic journal article The American Journal of Economics and Sociology

Suicide Rates in Taiwan

Article excerpt

The pooled suicide rates of 23 cities and counties in Taiwan from 1983 to 1993 were examined using a cross-sectionally heteroscedastic and time-wise auto-regressive technique. Support was found for advocacy that economics and sociology need to join forces for a better understanding of suicide (B. Yang, "The Economcy and Suicide: A Time-Series Study of the U.S.A." American Journal of Economics and Sociology v. 51, 1992, 87-99).

It was found that a combination of economic and social variables significantly accounted for the tremendous variations in suicide rates across Taiwan's cities and counties and over time. On the whole, economic variables appeared to have greater impact on regional suicide rates than sociological correlates. In particular, the level of income per capita in a region stood out as the most important predictor of suicide rates.

This study has also uncovered a few gender differences in the determination of regional suicide rates. The proportion of male elderly significantly raised the male suicide rates but the proportion of elderly females did not raise the female suicide rates. On the other hand, male suicide rates were not sensitive to the proportion of poor people in the region whereas female suicide rates were. Furthermore, the local suicide crisis intervention agency appeared to be especially effective in reducing female suicide rates in the region. …

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