Academic journal article Science Scope

X-Ray Vision

Academic journal article Science Scope

X-Ray Vision

Article excerpt

The advantage of using two eyes to see the world around us has long been associated solely with our capacity to see in 3-D. Now, a new study from a scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has uncovered a truly eye-opening advantage to binocular vision: our ability to see through things.

Most animals--fish, insects, reptiles, birds, rabbits, and horses, for example--exist in noncluttered environments like fields or plains, and they have eyes located on either side of their head. These sideways-facing eyes allow an animal to see in front of and behind itself, an ability also known as panoramic vision.

Humans and other large mammals--primates and large carnivores like tigers, for example--existed in cluttered environments like forests or jungles, and their eyes have evolved to point in the same direction. While animals with forward-facing eyes lose the ability to see what's behind them, they gain X-ray vision, according to Mark Changizi, assistant professor of cognitive science at Rensselaer, who says eyes facing the same direction have been selected for maximizing our ability to see in leafy environments like forests.

All animals have a binocular region--parts of the world that both eyes can see simultaneously--which allows for X-ray vision and grows as eyes become more forward facing. …

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