Academic journal article Journal of Higher Education

The Development of Salary Goal Modeling: From Regression Analysis to a Value-Based Approach

Academic journal article Journal of Higher Education

The Development of Salary Goal Modeling: From Regression Analysis to a Value-Based Approach

Article excerpt

Introduction

The complex institutional issue of faculty salary equity has legal, financial, and personal ramifications [2, 10, 22, 29]. Of course, any effective faculty reward system should be part of an institution's strategic planning process [10] and should reflect the institution's culture [30]. Ideally, equity systems should be responsive to organizational, interpersonal, and market factors [9, 10, 28, 29] as well as the political circumstances operating within the institution [30, 31]. From a more general perspective, Cascio maintains, "The dominant concern among compensation managers for the 1990s and beyond is how the compensation system links with organization and human resource strategies" [6, p. 422]. In spite of this acknowledged need for a comprehensive, planned approach, many institutions have responded to faculty equity issues in an ad hoc, reactionary manner [10]. This approach results in a variety of serious negative consequences including litigation, inefficient use of human resources, morale and productivity problems, and a violation of the ethical treatment of employees [6, 7, 10, 21, 27]. The purpose of this article is to describe how our institution, Frostburg State University [FSU], transformed a multiple regression approach to equity into a value-based prescriptive process of developing faculty salary goals. The historical setting and the formation of the task force will be described, followed by an examination of the issues, values, and factors used to design the model. Finally, applications of the model are presented.

Institutional Characteristics and Setting

Frostburg State is a regional comprehensive university located in rural northwestern Maryland. The university enrolled more than forty-six hundred undergraduate students and more than eight hundred graduate students in 1994. Its undergraduates were predominantly full-time (89%), while its graduate students were largely part-time students (81%). The institution employed 244 full-time faculty in academic year 1994-95. Following the relatively common path of development from teacher's college to liberal arts college to comprehensive university, FSU has, for at least the past twenty-five years, continuously emphasized teaching as the primary role of faculty. Across three major revisions of its faculty evaluation system between 1971 and 1995 the university placed substantially greater weight upon teaching than upon other categories of evaluation, such as scholarship and service.(1) Further, demonstrated excellence in teaching is the institution's primary criterion for promotion to the upper faculty ranks. The institution's emphasis on the teaching role has been expressed as well in long-standing efforts to sustain small-to-moderate class sizes. For example, in 1994-95, 85% of all classes enrolled 30 or fewer students, and the modal class size was 18 students. Student-faculty ratios have been relatively stable, ranging between 16 to 1 and 18 to 1.

Like other rural institutions, Frostburg has had to cope with a particular economic pressure unlike those facing urban and/or doctorate-granting institutions: the dearth of qualified part-time faculty and/or graduate teaching assistants. Getz and Siegfried [16] have described a national trend to substitute part-time for full-time faculty in the face of the rising costs of higher education. Rural universities cannot resort to this cost reduction strategy to the degree available to nonrural institutions. The outcome for FSU has been a heavy reliance on the most expensive form of staffing - full-time, fully benefited faculty. In the sciences, for example, in 1994-95 full-time faculty taught 90% of all science classes. The resulting high proportion and high numbers of full-time teaching faculty have placed great pressure on faculty salaries because the available funds are distributed among a larger-than-normal number of full- time faculty, especially when compared to other schools in the University of Maryland System. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.