Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Employees and Work/family Programs

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Employees and Work/family Programs

Article excerpt

While employers may adopt work/family benefit programs to strengthen employee commitment, whether the programs achieve that goal is an open question. Steven L. Grover and Karen J. Crooker explore the relationship between work/family benefits and worker commitment from the employee perspective in the 1995 Personnel Psychology (vol. 48). The authors suggest that individuals most likely to take advantage of the benefits will show greater commitment to their employer and less intention to leave the organization. However, they also speculate that the provision of work/family benefits will operate similarly for those unlikely to take advantage of programs, as the benefits are seen as general indicators of corporate concern and responsibility.

Using the employed portion of a nationally representative survey of households, Grover and Crooker test the effects of provision of several work/family benefits on attachment to the organization--parental leave, flexible schedules, child care assistance, and child care information. Attachment is measured using scales on attitudinal commitment and intent to find a job in another organization ("turnover intention"). The results show that the group of benefits as a whole affects employees' commitment and turnover intention. In addition, maternity leave with the guarantee of a job upon return and availability of information on child care are associated with lower turnover intention, and flexible scheduling positively affects commitment. …

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