Academic journal article Nineteenth-Century Prose

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Nineteenth-Century Prose

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

On more than one occasion, regular readers of this journal have commented to one of the editors that our "Reviews" section is particularly valuable to them. Our policy of permitting reviewers to write 1000-2000 words on new scholarly publications allows us to publish detailed analyses of works in which many readers have more than a passing interest. This issue's collection of reviews seems especially strong, as scholars from a wide range of schools across America (and from overseas) have contributed an unusually large number of critiques--so many that we decided to move our special issue on Newman to next summer so we could get these reviews into the hands of our readers before the books under discussion grew too old.

The articles in this number are, once again, a pot pourri intended to broaden readers' awareness of writers not normally treated in "canonical"--or even "non-canonical"--journals dealing with Victorian figures. Harriet Blodgett's examination of Francis Newman's essay on women writers seems to us a valuable reminder that some men (besides John Stuart Mill) were sympathetic to women's issues before the middle of the present century. …

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