Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Backpack on Board: Individual Air Monitoring Predicts Prenatal Exposure to PAHs

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Backpack on Board: Individual Air Monitoring Predicts Prenatal Exposure to PAHs

Article excerpt

Scientists studying human exposure to air pollutants have traditionally had to rely on data from stations monitoring ambient pollution levels. These stations are unable to account for neighborhood variation of or indoor exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke, and thus do not capture personal exposures. An international group of researchers studying pregnant women in Krakow, Poland, found they could accurately predict individual exposures by using data from personal air monitors, allowing the development of a predictive model of exposure that may be generalizable to pregnant women in similar exposure settings [EHP 116:1509-1518; Choi et al.]. Moreover, they found most of the women's exposure was to outdoor pollutants that penetrated indoors.

The researchers assessed the exposure of 34l nonsmoking pregnant women to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous carcinogenic compounds formed by the incomplete burning of wood, coal, oil, and other organic substances. The eight PAHs selected for analysis are associated with a variety of health effects including cancer, developmental abnormalities, and asthma. PAHs are known to cross the placenta and have been demonstrated to pose significant harm to developing fetuses.

Pregnant women were recruited from prenatal clinics in the center and outskirts of the city. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.