Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Bisphenol a Suppresses Release of Adipose Hormone: Exposure May Contribute to Metabolic Syndrome

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Bisphenol a Suppresses Release of Adipose Hormone: Exposure May Contribute to Metabolic Syndrome

Article excerpt

Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, is ubiquitous throughout the environment, and its widespread presence in human serum has been well documented. Although animal research indicates that BPA can alter several metabolic functions, interpretation of human data has been more controversial. A new study now presents evidence confirming that exposure of human adipose tissue and isolated fat cells to environmentally relevant levels if BPA suppresses release of the hormone adiponectin [EHP 116:1642-1647; Hugo et al.]

A high-calorie diet and sedentary lifestyle have both traditionally been linked to metabolic syndrome--the presence of a constellation of metabolic risk factors including insulin resistance, hypertension, and elevated blood sugar and lipid levels--but researchers are now examining environmental factors as additional causes. Adiponectin increases insulin sensitivity and reduces tissue inflammation, so suppression of its release could lead to insulin resistance and increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome, the authors write.

The study examined three types of adipose tissue samples taken during breast reduction, abdominoplasty, and gastric bypass surgery. The research team incubated each type of tissue for 6 hours in BPA or estradiol ([E.sub.2]), an endogenous human estrogen. They used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure secreted adiponectin. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.