Academic journal article Wordsworth Circle

From the Editor

Academic journal article Wordsworth Circle

From the Editor

Article excerpt

From our beginning in 1970, The Wordsworth Circle set out to reflect and record the activities of Romantic scholars. TWC was to be a new kind of quarterly publication with peer reviewed essays, lectures, notes, library lists, profiles of contemporaries, whatever interested our readers, whatever our colleagues were doing, needed, cared about. From the first mimeographed pages to our most recent issue, we tried to retain that image. Although we always published on all of Romanticism, everything that influenced or impinged on it, from every field and country, in every language, we called it "The Wordsworth Circle" because, in his generation, Wordsworth lived the longest, encountered, read, and knew the most of all writers--a statement I am not prepared to defend. But, there is always one thing more, something "ever more about to be," Wordsworth knew, and that is what we need to know--what is missing, what needs to be reviewed, recollected, restored, replaced, discovered, challenged, explored, overturned, dismissed, initiated, anticipated, reversed, revised, or repeated? How can we enrich and refresh our conversation, alter its course, enlarge the circle, respond to other voices in other journals, fields, disciplines, institutions, languages, reflect and serve, two words that have defined our function. We are on line: mgaull@bu.edu.

Among our losses this year, a dear friend and frequent contributor, Douglas Wilson, who died in Boulder, Colorado, on September 4, 2008. Wilson graduated from Williams College in 1952, earned an M.A. from Oxford in 1958, and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1967. He taught at Williams College before joining the English Department at University of Denver. Wilson published many essays on Romantic literature in TWC and elsewhere. His 1972 essay "Two Modes of Apprehending Nature: A Gloss on the Coleridgean Symbol" (PMLA 87 [1972]:42-52) is a model of lucid and meticulous scholarship relating Coleridge's use of "symbol," with his concepts of nature. On Wordsworth, his original, learned and, again, lucid essay on language appeared in PMLA, "Wordsworth's Images of Language: Voice and Letter in The Prelude," 101 (May, 1986), 351-361, an essay still influential among Wordsworthians, rhetoricians and linguists alike. …

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