Academic journal article Journal of Accountancy

IRS Oks Rolling Average

Academic journal article Journal of Accountancy

IRS Oks Rolling Average

Article excerpt

The IRS now considers a rolling-average method of inventory costing used for financial statements to be acceptable as well for income tax reporting, assuming the taxpayer satisfies one of two safe harbors. Additionally, the IRS furnishes automatic consent to change to a rolling-average method.

Companies in various industries view the rolling-average method to be a reliable approach to estimation of inventory and cost of goods sold and therefore use it for financial reporting. Revenue Procedure 2008-43, issued in June, states that the IRS may accept this method for income tax reporting, assuming it is reliable for the taxpayer in question. The method might not accurately reflect the taxpayer's income, however, where inventory is held for several years or its costs are unstable. Additionally, if the taxpayer is not using the rolling average for accounting, this method may not be suitable for reflecting taxable income.

Accordingly, the rolling-average method will be deemed to accurately reflect income where (1) the taxpayer recalculates the rolling average every time it purchases or produces an additional unit of an item, or on a regular basis of at least once a month, and (2) the taxpayer meets either of two tests: (a) the ending inventory cost under the rolling-average method does not vary by more than 1% from its cost under the first-in, first-out (FIFO) or other specific identification method used, or (b) the entire inventory of the taxpayer turns over at least four times a year. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.