Academic journal article Federal Communications Law Journal

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Federal Communications Law Journal

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

I am delighted to welcome you to the first Issue of the sixty-first Volume of the Federal Communications Low Journal, the nation's premier communications law journal and the official journal of the Federal Communications Bar Association. The new staff is very excited to present this special Issue.

The breakup of AT&T was a landmark moment for communications law professionals and scholars. The 25th anniversary of the AT&T breakup led many such scholars, judges, and professionals to gather at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Technology, Innovation, and Competition for a conference entitled "The Enduring Lessons of the Breakup of AT&T: A Twenty-Five Year Retrospective." The Conference included a diverse group of panelists, many of whom played key roles in the litigation. They discussed the success of the breakup policies, the shift towards access regulation, structural separation in dynamic markets, the impact of the Trinko decision on antitrust, the efficacy of consent decrees, and the future of intercarrier compensation. Notably, the Honorable Richard A. Posner addressed the Conference, offering his personal reflections on the breakup.

We are pleased to present Articles featuring a variety of the perspectives and insights presented at the Conference in this Issue. These Articles include the following: Professor Christopher S. Yoo provides an introduction; the Honorable Richard A. Posner recollects his personal involvement in the events that led up the Justice Department's major antitrust suit against AT&T; Joseph H. Weber provides a brief overview essay on the background of the AT&T divestiture, the antitrust suit, and the near and long-term results; Professor Paul MacAvoy presents a Lerner Index analysis of AT&T's performance in the wireline long-distance markets after divesture; Professor Gerald Faulhaber discusses the transition from rate regulation to access regulation and whether access regulation will work; Professor Daniel Spulber and Professor Christopher S. Yoo examine early rationales for telephone regulation, review types of regulation and analyze access using a graph theory approach; Professor Eli Noam provides an empirical analysis of AT&T and Bell Canada to analyze the success of the divestiture; Professor Timothy Brennan compares the court's antitrust reasoning in Trinko with that used in the antitrust case against AT&T and asks if antitrust and regulation should be combined; Professor Richard Epstein analyzes the pattern of the success of consent decrees; Professor Phillip Weiser reviews the compelling need for institutional reform of antitrust merger remedies, particularly with respect to how the FCC oversees mergers between telecommunications companies; and Professor Jerry Hausman, J. …

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