Academic journal article International Journal of Doctoral Studies

Selecting an Appropriate Publication Outlet: A Comprehensive Model of Journal Selection Criteria for Researchers in a Broad Range of Academic Disciplines

Academic journal article International Journal of Doctoral Studies

Selecting an Appropriate Publication Outlet: A Comprehensive Model of Journal Selection Criteria for Researchers in a Broad Range of Academic Disciplines

Article excerpt

Background

The goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive model of the considerations that an author ought to contemplate when selecting a journal for submission of a manuscript. Most academics are required to conduct research and publish results. Journal selection is particularly important to academics because as Donovan (n.d.) explained:

Although we all publish in a range of academic forms and forums, such as conference abstracts, book reviews, papers in conference proceedings, invited chapters, and books and monographs ..., it is the peer-reviewed journal articles that receive the most notice from promotion panels and search committees ... (p. 1)

Academics typically make journal selection decisions repeatedly throughout their careers. Since the submission and evaluation process can easily take months and academic researchers are expected to submit a manuscript to only one journal at any given time, the proper selection of a journal is critical to publishing success. Yet, we found very little prior research specifically directed at the topic of journal selection and no existing model or framework to guide the process.

Our initial goal was to develop a model of journal selection for the disciplines in which we typically publish, Information Systems and Informing Science. Here Information Systems is defined as "the field of inquiry that attempts to provide the business client with information in a form, format, and schedule that maximizes its effectiveness," while Informing Science is defined as the emerging transdiscipline whose goal is to "provide their clientele with information in a form, format, and schedule that maximizes its effectiveness" (Cohen, 1999). Thus, Information Systems is a subset of Informing Science, and Informing Science overlaps with virtually all other disciplines, since it is difficult to conceive of a discipline that would not include the need to inform efficiently and effectively. Given the breadth of these disciplines, it soon became apparent that any journal selection model that would be appropriate for Information Systems and Informing Science would also be appropriate for a wide range of academic researchers in a variety of fields. Thus, our goal became the development of a comprehensive model that would guide the journal selection process for academic authors in general, regardless of discipline. Initially, we expected this model to include coverage of some disciplinary distinctions; however, as the rest of this paper demonstrates, we ultimately found little differentiation, even between widely disparate disciplines. Table 1 lists the major disciplines researched for this study.

Previous Research

Despite searching within a wide range of academic disciplines, we found only two prior research papers directly aimed at the journal selection process. Both appeared in nursing journals. The first, a case study in a nursing journal, detailed the process of submitting an article to six different journals before achieving acceptance (van Teijlingen & Hundley, 2002). While the authors did not specifically develop a framework or model of the journal selection process, they did highlight insights that they had gained into the process. These include matching the writing style and terminology used within the journal, meshing with the multidisciplinary or unidisciplinary nature of the journal, the journal's lag time to publication, the level of credibility attached to the journal, and the journal's Impact Factor, defined as the number of times an average article in that journal is cited within a year. The second article on the journal selection process (Saver, 2006) advised authors to consider whom they want to reach, whether the journals they are considering are peer-reviewed, and how often the journals are published (as an indicator of how long it might take an article to be published).

A related article that does not directly address the journal selection process as a whole, argues that bibliometrics can be used to identify suitable journal outlets (Robinson, 1991). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.