Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Implanted Telescope Improves Vision of Individuals with AMD

Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Implanted Telescope Improves Vision of Individuals with AMD

Article excerpt

A glass telescope, the size of a pea, was successfully implanted in the eyes of numerous people with severely damaged retinas due to untreatable late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The Implantable Miniature Telescope (IMT) is a micro-sized precision telescope that is implanted in one eye in an outpatient surgical procedure conducted under local anesthesia. The telescopes, manufactured by VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies in Saratoga, California, are designed to magnify (from 2.2x to 3.0x magnification, depending on the model) images on the retina, providing central vision. The nonimplanted eye continues to provide peripheral vision in patients who receive IMT. Although the device does not cure AMD, several phases of clinical trials have revealed that it has benefitted patients with the disease. "The published data show improved visual acuity in end-stage AMD patients that was maintained over two years--a three-line improvement that we have previously shown makes a real impact on our patients' independence and quality of life," said Henry L. Hudson, a retina specialist in Tucson, Arizona, and lead author of two published research articles on the results of the clinical trials. In a recent New York Times article, Dr. Hudson explained that the device cannot be implanted in all individuals with AMD; he said, "'Maybe only 20 out of every 100 candidates will get the telescope. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.