Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Monist: October 2009, Vol. 92, No. 4

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Monist: October 2009, Vol. 92, No. 4

Article excerpt

Forgiveness: An Introduction, LEO ZAIBERT

Blame Versus Forgiveness, JOHN KEKES

Anger, Faith, and Forgiveness, ANDREA C. WESTLUND

Recent philosophical literature on forgiveness has, with a few exceptions, converged on the view that to forgive is to overcome resentment for moral reasons. In this literature, it is typically taken for granted that overcoming resentment is a necessary condition for forgiveness. This view is sometimes mistakenly attributed to Joseph Butler. In fact, Butler argues that to forgive is to avoid abuses of resentment and to respond to an offender just as any unprejudiced "good men" would respond. The forgiving person need not eliminate all resentment but, rather, must not allow an excess or perversion of resentment to drive out all goodwill toward the offender. This paper offers a reconstruction of Butler's model in "fideistic" terms, arguing that forgiveness is best understood as expressing moral faith in an offender, and that the psychological state of one who forgives may include a morally constructive tension between resentment and goodwilL--Correspondence to: westlund@uwm.edu

A Little Treatise of Forgiveness and Human Nature, INGVAR JOHANSSON

The "paradox of forgiveness" says: to forgive is to forgive a person for a particular culpable wrongdoing, but if the wrongdoing is culpable there is no reason to forgive him/her for it. …

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