Academic journal article Nathaniel Hawthorne Review

From the Editor's Gable

Academic journal article Nathaniel Hawthorne Review

From the Editor's Gable

Article excerpt

My thanks go out to all those who helped me during the first months of my editorship. I am most grateful to Mary C. English, Professor in the Montclair State Classics and Humanities Department, whose advice to me was invaluable and without whom this breaking-in period would have been far more difficult. Her experience as editor of her own journal, The Classical Outlook, taught me much--so that I could pose the questions I did not even know I was supposed to ask. I also appreciate the help and expertise of past editors, Frederick Newberry and John Idol, and the moral support of friends and colleagues, Lee Person, Jana Argersinger, Rita Gollin, and Larry Reynolds. Finally, I am grateful to Gretchen Henkel, for having taught me the basics of the InDesign layout program.

Looking ahead, I am planning two special issues for the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review: one, for the fall of 2009, on Hawthorne's later writings, guest-edited by David Greven and Magnus Ullen, and another, for the spring of 2010, on Hawthorne's children's writing. I am still considering proposals for the latter special issue, so please contact me as soon as possible if you are thinking of submitting a piece. If you have ideas for future special issues, please let me know. When submitting any essay to the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, note the change in submission policy: send your essay as an MS WORD doc file by attachment to elbertm@mail.montclair.edu, and remove your name from the title page. Other requirements are listed on the inside front cover. Also, looking ahead, under the auspices of the Hawthorne Society, I hope to make possible an annual award for a best essay written by a graduate student or a beginning junior scholar. More details on this award will follow in the fall issue.

The essays in my inaugural issue range from Hawthorne's gender politics to wife Sophia's race politics and from Hawthorne's interest in photography to his interest in woman's body as the subject of his gaze. The first two essays focus on the political implications of the Hawthornes' non-fiction writing. In "A Man for the Whole Country: Marketing Masculinity in the Pierce Biography," Leland S. Person demonstrates how Hawthorne's friendship with Franklin Pierce caused him to reconsider issues of manhood as he marketed Pierce's masculinity for the (Presidential) campaign biography of his college and lifelong friend. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.