Academic journal article Oregon Historical Quarterly

Oregonscape

Academic journal article Oregon Historical Quarterly

Oregonscape

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

WHERE THE SOUTH FORK OF THE Santiam River meets Soda Creek, fourteen miles east of Sweet Home, Oregon, lies Cascadia Mineral Springs, a cold-flowing soda spring that was a popular resort destination for Oregonians during the early twentieth century. In 1895, George M. Geisendorfer, suffering from tuberculosis, bought the land with the springs from homesteader John A. Bletch. Influenced by an American infatuation with the health properties of mineral spring water, Geisendorfer hoped his illness would be cured by his own springs. The following year, he opened the Cascadia Mineral Springs resort to the public, and it soon became, as the Oregonian newspaper raved on September 7, 1913, "one of the most delightful summer resorts in Oregon."

In its heyday, from 1910 to 1930, the resort featured a thirty-room hotel built by Geisendorfer himself with timber harvested from the land, a bath house with hot and cold water, a camping area that could hold 1,000 guests, fifteen vacation cabins, stables for eighty horses, a grocery store with the only telephone in the area, and a post office. An average of 1,000 people a week vacationed at the resort.

This photograph of the Cascadia Mineral Springs was taken in about 1899. …

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