Academic journal article Childhood Education

Structuring Out-of-School Time to Improve Academic Achievement: A Practice Guide

Academic journal article Childhood Education

Structuring Out-of-School Time to Improve Academic Achievement: A Practice Guide

Article excerpt

STRUCTURING OUT-OF-SCHOOL TIME TO IMPROVE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: A Practice Guide (NCEE #2009-012). Beckett, M., Borman, G., Capizzano, J., Parsley, D., Ross, S., Schirm, A., & Taylor, J. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2009. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/ publications/practiceguides. Many educators believe that extended day academic programs can supplement and enhance what is learned within the school day. With today's emphasis on school accountability and student achievement, these out-of-school time programs (OST) can provide meaningful contexts in which to improve student achievement and, perhaps, close the gap between low- and high-performing students. Although such programs operate all over the United States, conflicts in perspective exist on what programs or elements of these programs actually benefit student performance. For example, findings from the national evaluation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) program, which is the largest after school program in the United States, show that, on average, students participating in the programs showed no improvement in academic achievement. …

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