Academic journal article Human Ecology

Mental Health Problems Contribute to Persistent Food Insecurity

Academic journal article Human Ecology

Mental Health Problems Contribute to Persistent Food Insecurity

Article excerpt

When low-income mothers and children suffer from mental health problems, their families are less likely to have consistent access to nutritional foods, according to a new study conducted by researchers in Nutritional Sciences.

Poor mental health is associated with keeping families "food-insecure" over time by preventing the depressed household member from working, preventing other household members from working, and limiting access to childcare for depressed children.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The study was published in the August issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. The lead author is iMegan Lent '06, a Nutritional Sciences research aide. Other authors include Lindsay Petrovic '07; Josephine Swanson, former assistant dean for extension and outreach; and Nutrition Professor Christine Olson.

The team conducted annual in-depth interviews with 30 low-income mothers in two rural counties in New York over the course of three years.

"We wanted to know about family well-being, including whether families had enough of the right kinds of foods to eat in order to be healthy, " explained Lent. "What we found is that, over the three years, in families who started off food-insecure and ended up food-insecure, the mother was more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.