Academic journal article International Journal of Applied Educational Studies

Exploratory Study of Ege University School of Agriculture Students' Opinion of Globalization and Curricula Design for Related Instruction

Academic journal article International Journal of Applied Educational Studies

Exploratory Study of Ege University School of Agriculture Students' Opinion of Globalization and Curricula Design for Related Instruction

Article excerpt

Introduction

There is renewed interest in international education in American Universities. This is not a surprising development given the advent of a more intensified process of globalization and its consequences for increased levels of interactions and connections among nations. What is surprising is the relative lack of effort in drawing directly on perspectives from other cultures for developing curricula to address the need for international educational. In this study, the researchers report on Ege University School of Agriculture students' perspectives on globalization and the related content for designing curricula.

An array of factors, such as: new communication and computer technologies, the movement to open market economies, the free movement of technologies and capital across borders, outsourcing, the spread of democracy the demand for accountability and transparency and the increasing connectedness among nations (Friedman, 2006; Giddens, 2003; Snyder, 2007;) have catalyzed change across social, political and economic systems worldwide. These changes have drawn attention to the need for educating students to live and work in a new global environment. In this evolving global environment, the challenge facing educators from all cultures is preparing students to function in the existing and anticipated global state of affairs. Educators are continually trying to predict and interpret social, economic, technological and political trends in order to develop the next set of curricula that meet the needs of students who will live and work in a global society (Parker, Ninomiya & Cogan, 1999). While educators are the recognized experts in curriculum design and leaders of the curriculum design process, they are only one of many sources of information that should be consulted when selecting content and other design features of a curriculum; the learners themselves are also an important source of information on content and process in designing a curriculum (Tyler, 1969). This principle of curriculum design was one motivation for investigating Turkish students' perception of globalization and their opinion on what content should be included in curricula designed to address emerging global issues. Another, and equally important, reason is to gather information about curricula content from other cultures in order to capture and infuse the global studies curriculum at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University with a global perspective, which is essential for preparing students for a future in a global world.

The usual tendency in curriculum development is to rely on national expertise as opposed to drawing on regional or multinational expertise. The techniques and perspectives employed by these curriculum developers have been limited in outlook and scope. Nonetheless, the national and intra-national focus of their work has accomplished important goals in support of the development of a national and local political economy, and military-industrial competition and cooperation with other nations. But, in the process, other goals have been removed from consideration or placed so far out on the periphery of curriculum deliberations as to be taken seriously by almost no one, even if they are included with some regularity in official curriculum documents (Parker, Ninomiya & Cogan, 1999).

In sum, if global education is to provide students with the competence to function effectively in today's global society, and at the same time prepare them for tomorrow's post modern global world, global education curricula must incorporate their opinions, ideas and perspectives as well as those from other cultures. In the next section, the researchers elaborate on the context of the study, i.e., the nature of globalization and the emerging global issues that play a role in shaping students' attitude toward globalization and their perceptions of relevant curricula content. We follow this section with a brief discussion of the implications of globalization and associated emerging issues for global education. …

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