Academic journal article College Student Journal

The Effect of Late Registration for College Classes

Academic journal article College Student Journal

The Effect of Late Registration for College Classes

Article excerpt

Objective: To assess the outcome of late registration for college classes and early class withdrawal.

Method: Computerized 2007-9 school record data on 7,200 college students were analyzed to evaluate the effect of late class registration on the class grade--relative to the average class grade--and on class withdrawal. Assessed by multiple regression analyses in relation to these outcomes were gender, academic level and assignment to large or small lecture sections.

Results: Late registration for class was found to be associated with lower grades relative to the average grade for the class (p<0.001). That effect was more pronounced for male students, upper classmen, and students in large lecture sections. Withdrawal from class was significantly more common for upper classmen, but it was not significantly related to late class registration.

Conclusion: Late registration for college classes is associated with lower grades relative to the class average, but not to early class withdrawal. Key variables had a significant impact on these outcomes.

Background

Studies generally have reported that late registration for college classes is associated with worse outcomes. Ford et al. (2008) and Chilton (1964) found that late registrants for class compared to those who registered on time had lower grades, and Smith et al. (2002) found that late registration was linked to class withdrawal and failure to reenroll the next semester. Hiller et al. (2005) likewise found that being late to register was linked to both poor classroom performance and a diminished persistence in college enrollment. An exception to the above studies was the report by Angelo (1990) who reported no adverse outcomes for late college registrants.

Much of the literature on late registration for college classes has focused on the characteristics of such students. Belcher and Patterson (1990) found that late registrants tended to be older and were more often enrolled part-time. Hornik et al. (2008) and Chilton (1964) reported class and school dropout to be more common with freshman than higher level students. Miller (1997) found that class withdrawal was linked to low classroom attendance and low classroom attentiveness, whereas Geltner (1996) found that class and school dropout were more common for males than for females, and that they were linked to a substantial level of employment (greater than 9 hours a week).

This study assesses the impact of late class registration on grades relative to average grades for that class and on withdrawal from class. It covers 7,200 students at all academic levels in mathematics classes (many of whom matriculated in general education classes). This is the largest sample of students comparing the consequences of on-time vs. late class registration, and as such it allows for more varied and comprehensive outcome assessments than have been hitherto reported.

Method

The independent variables included: 1) late or on-time registration 2) academic level 3) assignment to large or small lecture sections, and 4) gender. Outcome variables included: 1) class grade in relation to the average grade in the matriculated class, and 2) withdrawal from class.

Data on enrollment of college students over four semesters (Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, and Spring 2009) were included in this research. In all, there were 135 lecture sections, 22 large lecture sections, and 113 small lecture sections. Eleven of the 22 large lecture sections were for general education elementary statistics. The other 11 large lecture sections were for general education business calculus. Of the 113 small lecture sections, 38 were for calculus I, 33 calculus II, 22 calculus III, 4 numerical analysis, 10 applied mathematics, and 6 probability and statistics. Of the 7,200 students who registered (including some who would later withdraw), 3,180 were assigned to large lecture sections, and 4,020 to small lecture sections. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.