Academic journal article The Upstart Crow

Dear Readers

Academic journal article The Upstart Crow

Dear Readers

Article excerpt

Dear Readers,

It is my pleasure to introduce Volume XXVIII (2009), "Politics and the Citizen in Shakespeare." This issue marks a transitional moment for The Upstart Crow: it is the last volume to draw on the annual Clemson Shakespeare Festival, which came to a conclusion in 2008. Thus, this volume is an occasion to celebrate the wealth of scholarship and the invigorating exchange of ideas inspired by the Shakespeare Festival during its seventeen-year run, while looking forward to a new chapter for The Upstart Crow, which we initiate in 2010 with a special guest-edited issue.

Our two lead essays this year are derived from the 2008 Clemson Shakespeare Festival and consider "Politics and the Citizen" from different angles. Margaret Maurer, Colgate University, writes about the poet in Julius Caesar as a way of considering poetry's role in discourses of politics and citizenship. Nicholas Radel, Furman University, calls for a re-consideration of the early modern politics of race and sexuality in Romeo and Juliet as refracted through Baz Luhrmann's late twentieth-century film adaptation. Essays by Stephanie Chamberlain and Gabriel Rieger speak to the mutual constitution of the public and private spheres in, respectively, The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night's Dream. The issue also features provocative essays by James Stone, on the ambivalent connotations of gold in The Merchant of Venice, and Fred Blick, on the tennis metaphor in Shakespeare's Sonnet 88. …

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