Academic journal article Science and Children

Giant Moa

Academic journal article Science and Children

Giant Moa

Article excerpt

Scientists have performed the first DNA-based reconstruction of the giant extinct moa bird, using prehistoric feathers recovered from caves and rock shelters in New Zealand.

Researchers from the University of Adelaide and Landcare Research in New Zealand have identified four different moa species after retrieving ancient DNA from moa feathers believed to be at least 2,500 years old.

The giant birds--measuring up to 2.5 m and weighing 250 kg--were the dominant animals in New Zealand's prehuman environment but were quickly exterminated after the arrival of the Maori around 1280 AD.

PhD student Nicolas Rawlence from the University's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA says until now, the scientific community has not known what the 10 different species of moa looked like. "By using ancient DNA we have been able to connect feathers to four different moa species," he says.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The researchers compared the feathers to others found in the sediments from red-crowned parakeets that are still living today, determining they had not faded or changed in color. They then reconstructed the appearance of the stout-legged moa, heavy-footed moa, upland moa, and the South Island giant moa. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.