Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Answers from Apollo 11 Moon Rocks

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Answers from Apollo 11 Moon Rocks

Article excerpt

A lunar geochemist at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) says that there are still many answers to be gleaned from the Moon rocks collected by the Apollo 11 astronauts on their historic Moon walk 40 years ago. He credits another WUSTL professor for the fact that the astronauts even collected the Moon rocks in the first place.

Randy L. Korotev, a research professor in the WUSTL Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences in Arts and Sciences, has studied lunar samples and their chemical compositions since he was an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin and "was in the right place at the right time" in 1969 to be a part of a team that studied some of the first lunar samples.

"We know even more now and can ask smarter questions as we research these samples," says Korotev, who is mainly interested in studying the impact history of the Moon, how the Moon's surface has been affected by meteorite impacts, and the nature of the early lunar crust. "There are still some answers, we believe, in the Apollo 11 mission."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

We sent missions to the Moon and collected samples before we knew much about the Moon. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.