Academic journal article The Journal of Early and Intensive Behavioral Intervention

Editorial

Academic journal article The Journal of Early and Intensive Behavioral Intervention

Editorial

Article excerpt

This issue amply demonstrates the intentionally broad scope of the Journal of Early and Intensive Behavior Intervention. One of the journal's aims is to bring to early interventionists information from areas that they might not otherwise venture into. To this end, the articles represented here cover a wide range: basic and applied, experimental and theoretical, behavioral and non-behavioral, and relate to a wide range of clinical and non-clinical populations.

The works employing a core behavioral viewpoint appear early in the issue. Tsiuouri and Greer examine the use of Skinner's Verbal Behavior in treating severe language delay in two children. From within the behavior analytic paradigm, they provide single-subject experimental data on how social reinforcement can increase echoic tacts. The second article, by St. Peter Pipkin, Winters, and Diller, also sticks closely to the behavioral paradigm, and again employs single-subject experimental designs with two children. The children in this study were lagging behind their typical kindergarten classmates in behavior and pre-academic skills. This time, edible reinforcers, goal setting, and instructions were shown to be effective in increasing letter naming by these children.

The third article, by Carbone, Morgenstern, Zecchin-Tirri, and Kolberg brings attention to the importance of motivating operations in applied research and practice. In particular, the authors elaborate on the importance of recognizing the use of the reflexive conditioned motivating operation (CMO-R), especially in discrete trial programs for children with autism by enhancing the effectiveness of reinforcers.

The article by Forgatch and De Garmo takes a broad systems approach to developmental problems by focusing on the parenting and economic skills of mothers experiencing divorce. Using a group design with mothers from the Oregon Divorce Study, the researchers looked at how parent training increased incomes and reduced financial stress in comparison with mothers who did not receive such training. …

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