Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Journal of the History of Philosophy: April 2010, Vol. 48, No. 2

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Journal of the History of Philosophy: April 2010, Vol. 48, No. 2

Article excerpt

Plato's Republic in the Recent Debate, FRANCESCO FRONTEROTTA

This paper discusses some issues of the recent debate on Plato's Republic, considering both the dialogue's ethical and political project and its psychological, epistemological, and ontological implications, depending on the famous statement that the philosophers only, by virtue of their knowledge, must be set as guides of such a project. Some of the main critical contributions, from different schools and exegetical backgrounds, are extensively examined.

The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth: Robert Grosseteste on Universals (and the Posterior Analytics), CHRISTINA VAN DYKE

Contemporary scholars tend to assume that one cannot be both Aristotelian and Augustinian with respect to the universals that serve as the objects of human cognition; the heated debates in the latter thirteenth century between proponents of the "new" Aristotelianism and adherents of "traditional" theories of divine illumination appear to bear out this point. In this paper, however, it is argued that Robert Grosseteste's early commentary on the Posterior Analytics (CPA)--written just as Aristotle's work on demonstrative science was gaining a foothold in the Latin West--assumes that Aristotle's position complements rather than contradicts the illuminationist theory he advocates in earlier works. In particular, it is maintained in this paper (against common consensus) that Grosseteste's real intent in his detailed discussion of the principles of cognizing in CPA 1.7 is not to side with or argue against Aristotle, but, rather, to situate Aristotle's theory of universals explicitly within an Augustinian and Neoplatonic framework in order to provide the "whole truth" of human cognition. In so doing, Grosseteste blends and brings together the diverse elements of these systems and presents a synthetic rather than adversarial picture of these accounts--a feat many scholars have taken to be a philosophical impossibility. …

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