Academic journal article Sarmatian Review

Devolution in Academia

Academic journal article Sarmatian Review

Devolution in Academia

Article excerpt

Something momentous is happening in the nation's colleges and universities while few pay attention. According to John Curtis, director of research and public policy at the American Association of University Professors, in 2009 68 percent of faculty jobs nationwide were part-time or contract, rather than tenure-track positions that have traditionally been the backbone of academia (Jeannie Kever, "Job-hunting with a PhD isn't what it used to be," Houston Chronicle, 15 October 2009). Non-tenure-track instructors make about $20,000 a year, estimates Anne Heath-Welch, an adjunct at Kingwood College in Texas. She knows whereof she speaks: she is one of the untenured instructors.

A cleaning maid makes $80-$100 per day. Subtract holidays, sick leaves, vacations, and cleaning supplies, and you end up with what many instructors with doctorates get at our colleges and universities.

While this is going on, the salaries of top administrative officials at universities have skyrocketed, often over fifty times higher than those of untenured instructors. In the first decade of the twenty-first century, over twenty universities paid their presidents over one million dollars.

Even in comparison to full professors who often retire without achieving a six-digit salary figure, top administrators are paid exorbitant salaries. In the "good old days" any professor could become dean or president of his/her university through election by his colleagues. …

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