Academic journal article British Journal of Occupational Therapy

Fact or Fiction?

Academic journal article British Journal of Occupational Therapy

Fact or Fiction?

Article excerpt

At last there may be a glimmer of hope. Someone has raised her head above the parapet of administration, bureaucracy, rules and paperwork. Someone, it would appear, with more common sense than an entire organisation.

Iona Heath, a general practitioner and author of a recent publication in the British Medical Journal, has challenged the prohibition of sitting on patients' beds for visitors and clinicians alike. In a thought-provoking article, she argues that there is no evidence to support this ban as a method of infection control. Moreover, she highlights that the wider implications of this, in preventing patients from having close contact with health care professionals and relatives, has not been recognised properly (Heath 2010). She is to be congratulated on her stand and for questioning a convention that the rest of us have just accepted. Despite the critical need to communicate appropriately with our patients as part of providing high quality care, we have allowed this rule to become part of practice, no doubt believing that it was based on evidence and therefore must be for the greater good.

This article echoes another recent news item: the controversial story that 64 out of 80 people (who thought they were taking part in a French television game show) gave an actor in the Game of Death enough electric shocks apparently to kill him. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.