Academic journal article Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

With this issue of Legacy, long-time readers will note several changes in our treatment of the secondary scholarship on women. Part of the original intent of the journal was to demonstrate the extent and viability of scholarship in an emergent field eager to establish its bona fides in the academy. Twenty-five years later, the good news is that that argument has been soundly made. The current wealth of scholarship on American women writers has led us to revise our overall policy about how to apprise our readers of the state of the secondary scholarship in the field. We have reached the difficult decision that we can no longer hope to review every book that is related to our subject. We will continue, however, to publish a comprehensive Bookshelf listing twice yearly, in which we will account, insofar as it is possible, for everything published in our field.

The Legacy Bookshelf will no longer appear in print, but will be posted twice yearly on our website, at the same time the paper journal is mailed to subscribers. We will send you a reminder via the SSAWW listserv to consult it there. If you are not yet a member of that listserv, you may subscribe at .

In the pages thus freed up, we will continue to publish reviews of important books in the field, especially as they relate to the journal's continuing commitment to recovering the work of women writers, but will expand the length of each review by about twenty-five percent, hoping to offer readers a more complex evaluation of each book's content. Additionally, we will explore new ways of engaging with the most significant new scholarship in longer, more substantive and comparative ways. In this issue, for example, we print a lengthy review essay by Jeffrey Steele, himself a respected Margaret Fuller scholar, of three recent studies of that foundational writer and thinker. In future issues, we plan to engage several scholars in a conversation about a single new work, for example, or to invite reflections on how new works engage with and revise existing foundational texts in our discipline. …

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