Academic journal article Science and Children

Saving Energy

Academic journal article Science and Children

Saving Energy

Article excerpt

Many Americans believe that they can save energy with small behavioral changes that actually achieve very little; they also severely underestimate the major effects of switching to efficient technologies, according to a new survey of Americans in

34 states. The study, which quizzed people on what they perceived as the most effective ways to save energy, appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The largest group, nearly 20%, cited turning off lights as the best approach--an action that affects energy budgets relatively little. Few cited buying decisions that experts say would cut U.S. energy consumption dramatically, such as more efficient cars (cited by only 2.8%), more efficient appliances (cited by 3.2%), or weatherizing homes (cited by 2.1%). Previous researchers have concluded that households could reduce energy consumption some 30% by making such choices--all without waiting for new technologies, making big economic sacrifices, or losing their sense of well-being.

Shahzeen Attari, one author of the study, said multiple factors probably are driving the misperceptions.

"When people think of themselves, they may tend to think of what they can do that is cheap and easy at the moment," she said. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.