Academic journal article The Science Teacher

New Sea Slugs

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

New Sea Slugs

Article excerpt

Sometimes, treasures can be found in your own backyard--especially if you know what to look for. This is what happened to Jeff Goddard, project scientist with the Marine Science Institute at the University of California--Santa Barbara.

Goddard was working in the tide pools at Carpinteria Reef, in Carpinteria State Park, California, when he found a new species of nudibranch--a group of sea slugs noted for their bright colors and delicate forms. Recognizing it as new, Goddard carefully documented the living specimen before preserving it and sending it off to Terrence M. Gosliner, an authority on the taxonomy of sea slugs at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Goddard kept the slug in his lab for a few days, until it laid an egg mass and he was able to observe its early development and hatching larvae.

Gosliner named the new sea slug after Goddard when he described it, and one other newly discovered species of California nudibranch, in the online edition of the Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences.

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"The shallow-water nudibranch fauna of Southern California especially is well-known, so it was pretty exciting to find a new species right under our noses here in Santa Barbara County," says Goddard. …

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