Academic journal article ETC.: A Review of General Semantics

My Life Is a Drama on Facebook

Academic journal article ETC.: A Review of General Semantics

My Life Is a Drama on Facebook

Article excerpt

In the 1990s, I became convinced that "life is a drama" would be the dominating metaphor of our culture. This was because everyone spent so much time watching television, going to movies, or seeing the movies on VCRs. The drama that surrounded us was going to become the model for how to live our lives. "My life is a television show" would be the way people thought of daily life (see Gozzi, 1999, p. 110).

Since the mid-1990s, the personal computer, with computer games and the Internet, have entered the scene. The drama surrounding young people in the twenty-first century has increased. Young people now do not have to watch television or films to get their dose of drama; they can get it from their shootem-up computer games, or the latest messages on Twitter, or texts from friends on the phone. However, as I write this in summer of 2010, the biggest stage for drama seems to be the Web site known as Facebook.

Millions of people have their own pages on Facebook. Young people are constantly updating their pages, adding new digital photos of what they did yesterday, responding to messages from friends, posting their thoughts on anything that concerns them. Being a "friend" on Facebook can be very important, although many people have hundreds of Facebook friends they have never actually met. Even more important is when you get "unfriended" by someone on Facebook. This is a signal to you and all your connected friends that a relationship is over.

People get so excited to put funny photographs up on Facebook that they often seem to forget that someone they do not know might wind up seeing them. …

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