Academic journal article Military Review

Military Cooperation in Multinational Peace Operations: Managing Cultural Diversity and Crisis Response

Academic journal article Military Review

Military Cooperation in Multinational Peace Operations: Managing Cultural Diversity and Crisis Response

Article excerpt

MILITARY COOPERATION IN MULTINATIONAL PEACE OPERATIONS: Managing Cultural Diversity and Crisis Response, Joseph Soeters and Philippe Manigart, eds., Routledge, Abingdon, UK, 2008, 253 pages, $140.00.

Soeters and Manigart have mined some gold nuggets of truth about multinational military operations in an uneven compilation of overviews and case studies. Most of the writing focuses on recent European peace experiences with the UN and NATO. A few other major players, Australia and Japan, are also recognized. Its academic style of presentation, with high levels of theory, could challenge American practitioners. It will also give them unique views on key issues, which are usually ignored in an effort to create the semblance of unity.

No issue is discussed more often than the dominant role of the English language in multinational operations. Non-English speakers are highly sensitive to the value of native fluency and the dangers of miscommunication. For instance, peacekeepers in Kabul drove through high-risk territory because they preferred to be treated by German medics with better linguistic skills. Swedish officers on a UN operation noted the dominance of English speakers in formal meetings. Canadian instructors described the native speaker preference in high profile jobs. Too often, native English speakers mistakenly assumed other officers understood them when actually the non-natives were too embarrassed to expose their comprehension inadequacies. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.