Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The September Review

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

The September Review

Article excerpt

An increasing number of children living in nontraditional families has led to widespread research and commentary on the social and policy implications of such arrangements. Differences in children's well-being between two-parent and single-parent households have been identified and often attributed to differences in household income. In our opening article this month, Professor Megumi Omori notes that, "although it is well established that income is a strong indicator of children's well-being, less attention has been paid to possible differences in the allocation of economic resources, especially by family type." She goes on to explore determinants of expenditures relating to children's well-being by type of household, then compares those determinants across household types, especially between married-couple households and single-parent households.

Self-employment, notes BLS economist Steven F. Hipple, continues to be an important source of jobs in the United States. In 2009, more than 15 million people were self-employed, making up nearly 11 percent of total employment. …

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