Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

Academic journal article Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

Article excerpt

In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the opportunity to participate in weekly, voluntary lunch recess sport club sessions during the intervention period. SE elicited a moderate increase in autonomous motives in physical education. The TCM accounted for a significant proportion of the explained variance in lunch recess sport club intention and participation. Autonomy-supportive curricular models, such as SE, may have the potential to facilitate transfer of motivation and participation in physical activity from a physical education to an extracurricular context.

Key words: autonomous motivation, lunch recess physical activity, physical education

**********

Research has indicated that increasing young people's physical activity levels yields immediate and long-term health benefits, including weight control and obesity management (Strong et al., 2005). This health-related discourse regarding obesity prevention and treatment has created a renewed focus on physical education as a potential agent of change for increasing youth physical activity (National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2004). Unfortunately, research examining physical education curricula to promote extracurricular physical activity participation is lacking and warrants further attention (Shen, McCaughtry, & Martin, 2007).

There is considerable evidence identifying the motivational factors that are positively associated with physical activity behavior in young people (Sallis, Prochaska, & Taylor, 2000; Vallerand & Rousseau, 2001). Research has also shown that teacher behaviors, such as positive feedback statements, are strong predictors of students' intrinsic motivation in physical education (Koka & Hein, 2005). Few studies have examined the process by which curricula that influence motivational factors in physical education are translated into physical activity participation in choice-based leisure-time settings (Hagger, Chatzisarantis, Culverhouse, & Biddle, 2003). In the current study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to study the effect of an autonomy-supporting physical education instructional model (Sport Education; Siedentop, Hastie, & Van der Mars, 2004) on students' participation in a lunch recess sport-based physical activity opportunity.

Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

The TCM specifies the processes by which motivation for physical activity in a physical education context are transferred into a leisure-time physical activity context (Hagger et al., 2003). The model draws from three prominent theories--self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985), and the hierarchical model of motivation (Vallerand & Ratelle, 2002)--to provide a comprehensive explanation of these motivational processes. Self-determination theory provides the starting point for file trans-theoretical model and the key dispositional motivational constructs that energize behavior in both physical education and leisure-time contexts. The theory of planned behavior maps the process by which motivational constructs from self-determination theory are translated into action. Finally, the hierarchical model provides a unifying framework that describes the top-down links between the generalized, context-tied self-determination theory constructs and the specific, situational constructs from the theory of planned behavior.

Self-Determination Theory. Self-determination theory (SDT) is a dialectic, organismic theory of human motivation (Deci & Ryan, 2000). Its central theme is the distinction between autonomous and controlling forms of motivation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.