Academic journal article Oregon Historical Quarterly

Oregonscape

Academic journal article Oregon Historical Quarterly

Oregonscape

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

THE EARLIEST LOGGING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST took place along streams and rivers, where logs could be rolled or dragged for easy transport down the waterway to a sawmill. By the end of the nineteenth century, streamside areas were becoming logged out and the timber industry was turning to spur railroads to haul logs from more inaccessible interior areas. Building those back-country lines often required crossing rivers, curving around hills, and bridging gullies. One of the techniques used was cribbing, criss-crossing logs cut from nearby trees.

This bridge was built for the A.F. Coats Lumber Company in 1924. It was located near Tillamook, where the company operated a sawmill. The bridge was 350 feet long, 110 feet high, and 40 feet wide at the bottom. Nine men built it over a period of two months. At one time, it was claimed to be the world's largest crib bridge. …

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