Academic journal article Studia Anglica Posnaniensia: international review of English Studies

The Origin of Abandon and Random

Academic journal article Studia Anglica Posnaniensia: international review of English Studies

The Origin of Abandon and Random

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

Modern English ban and related lexemes will be shown to have their origin in common with abandon, the latter of disputed etymology. This applies to a still greater extent to random, for the origin of which a plausible solution will be presented. A last paragraph is devoted to the etymology of Modern English PLAN.

1. Introduction

Both abandon and random pose considerable problems as to their origin. In order to propose a convincing hypothesis, we postulate a semantic closeness and, as a following step, a formal relationship between the lexical sets ban n./v.; banish v.; band n.; abandon v., insofar as they go back to Germanic * ban(n), *banjan, *band, *bandwjan, the voiced stop d being lost (in final position) in the subset ban n./v.; banish v., etc.; see in particular the derivation of band n.; see also ban n. and bandon n., the latter two denoting the jurisdiction of a lord or sovereign. Our claim will be illustrated and supported by the following material ending in -an(-) and by a second group ending in -and(-).The case of Modern English PLAN n. illustrates the loss of -t after a nasal consonant.

2. Lexemes ending in -an(-)

ban v. ' forbid, prohibit' (c 1378, BDE)

ME banne(n), formed from OE bannan 'to summon, proclaim' (6th strong class) and AFr banir, baner; banner, bannir 'to proclaim; to summon by ban, to raise (an army); to banish, exclude' ([AND.sup.2]: banir), from Germanic *banjan. Cf. ModFr bannir (DEHF: 66a, 1213 'to proclaim', from Frankish *bannjan, Gothic *bandwjan, ultimately related to bande 'troop', influenced by ban) (BDE: 73b, s.v. ban1; KDEE: 96a, s.v. ban1; ODEE: 7la, s.v. [ban.sup.2]).

ban n. 'edict, proclamation' (c1300, BDE)

ME ban(ne), earlier meaning 'a troop of warriors summoned for proclamation' (c1250); still earlier in the phrase bane cruces 'crosses marking a boundary' (1228), formed from OE (ge)ban(n) 'summons, proclamation' and AFr ban, baan 'proclamation, edict; banishment; jurisdiction; (eccl.) marriage banns' ([AND.sup.2]: [ban.sup.1]), derived from the verb. Cf. ModFr ban (DEHF: 65a, 'proclamation of a lord' end 12th c., from Frankish *ban. Cf. ModG Bann (9th C., [Kluge.sup.24]) from Germanic *banna- 'summons, proclamation, order' (BDE: 74a, s.v. [ban.sup.2]; KDEE: 96a, s.v. [ban.sup.1]; ODEE: 71a, s.v. [ban.sup.1]).

banish v. (c1385, BDE; a1376, KDEE)

ME banyse(n), banysshe(n) 'to condemn, exile', adapted from AFr banir, baner; banner, bannir 'to proclaim; to summon by ban, to raise (an army); to banish, exclude' ([AND.sup.2]: banir), from Germanic *banjan. Cf. ModFr bannir (DEHF: 66a, 1213 'to proclaim', from Frankish *bannjan, Gothic *bandwjan. Ultimately related to bande 'troop', influenced by ban) (BDE: 75a; KDEE: 97a; ODEE: 73a).

banner n. 'flag, standard' (a1200?, BDE)

EME banere, also baner 'troops under a particular banner' (al300?), adapted from AFr baner, banere, baneere, banier, baniere, banire; bannere, banniere 'banner' ([AND.sup.2]: [baner.sup.1]), from ban. Cf. ModFr banniere (DEHF: 66a, 12th c., derived from Frankish *ban, ultimately from Germanic *band(w)-, see Gothic bandwa 'sign'). Cf. Italian bandiera 'banner' and Provencal ban(d)iera (DEI: 425a) and ModG Banner (12th c., [Kluge.sup.24]) from Old French banniere 'flag, banner' (BDE: 75b; KDEE: 97b; ODEE: 73b).

banneret n. (obs.) 'knight entitled to bring vassals into the field under his own banner/standard' (c 1300, KDEE)

ME baneret 'knight' (as defined above), adapted from OFr baneret (14th c.), derived from baner(e) + -et suffix, ultimately from Frankish *ban. Cf. ModFr banneret (DEHF: 65a, s.v. 1. ban, baneret 14th c., from Frankish *ban). See T/L I: 823, s.v. banerez 'little flag' and Godefroy I: 571a, s.v. banerete 'small flag' (BDE: ./.; KDEE: 97b, s.v. [banneret.sup.2]; ODEE: 73b).

banns n. 'notice of marriage' (1549, BDE)

EModE bannes, plural of banne, influenced by MedL bannum 'ban', adapted from MFr banns. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.