Academic journal article Journal of Transportation Management

From the Editor

Academic journal article Journal of Transportation Management

From the Editor

Article excerpt

I am happy to say that the state of the U. S. economy is far better at this writing than the last. The resilience of industry and the American people is evidenced by the continuing economic recovery. While we continue to recover from the aftermath of terrorism, we must remain vigilant and further strengthen transportation security. Our industry is the link that unites commerce and culture around the world.

You will no doubt have noticed the date on this issue of the Journal. The Board of Directors of Delta Nu Alpha voted to skip one publication year, in order to "catch up" with the issue date. This issue then, Volume 13, Number 1, Spring, 2002, will reach you in either late spring or early summer. Authors of the articles appearing in this issue will be very pleased with this decision. They will no longer have to explain to their colleagues why their work, published in the current year, carries last year's date. As I have explained to our readers previously, the lag in publication has been due to an insufficient volume of quality submissions--not to slow reviewers! I am confidant that this decision to skip publication dates in 2001 is the right one and that it will not be necessary again.

As a subscriber, you may be wondering whether or not you are due a refund of part or all of your subscription. I have been editor of the JTM for the past six years, and have published two issues each year, as will be the case in 2002. Since each subscriber will continue to receive two issues per year, each will receive exactly what they have paid for!

The subject matter of this issue is robust, ranging from trucking profitability to transportation policy issues. There should be something here for every reader, regardless of his or her position in industry. The lead article in this issue, by Hokey Min, describes an in-depth case study measuring the impact of lumper costs, empty miles, and shipment size on motor carrier profitability. The second article, by Ted Farris and Phil Wilson, examines attrition in the on-line grocery industry. They focus on logistics principles that play a large part in determining success or failure in this area of e-commerce. Shashi Kumar and Vijay Rajan follow the path of imports from Pacific-Rim nations to New England in the third article of this issue. …

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