Academic journal article Journal of Transportation Management

From the Editor

Academic journal article Journal of Transportation Management

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Welcome to the Fall 1999 issue of the Journal of Transportation Management If you take just a few minutes of your valuable time to scan the contents, I think that you will find something of interest both personally and professionally. The diversity of articles and topics covered goes beyond what you would expect to find and is indicative of the diversity defining our industry. I am always indebted to the authors for their patience, quality of research and writing, and for thinking of the JTM as an outlet for their work. I offer my sincere gratitude to the members of the Editorial Review Board who contribute to the success of this and every issue. Remember that the reviewers are volunteers--they agree to give their time and expertise and ask for nothing in return. I could not do my job without them. Steve Rutner and Brian Gibson, my associate editors, continue to add quality leadership and direction to the Journal Many people contributed to the completion of this issue. I'm sure that you will enjoy the end result!

The lead article in this issue, by Julie Gentry, Matthew Waller, and Scott Keller, reports the results of a study of purchasing strategies among manufacturing firms. They identify four hybrid purchasing strategies that fall between the two extremes of transaction-based and just-in-time purchasing. The second article, by Rick Clarke, chronicles the development of U.S. maritime unions and, more recently, their decline in membership and influence. Changes in union power and influence are also discussed within the context of maritime policy and regulation. Drew Stapieton and Virginie Saulnier discuss the history of INCOTERMS in the third article. In addition to carefully contrasting the 1990 and 2000 versions of the INCOTERMS, the article provides a dear and concise description of each of the 13 international commercial terms. Uma Gupta, Randy Butler, and Thomas Milner offer an inside look at the development of an automated gate system at Union Pacific Railroad in the fourth article of this issue. The case study follows the implementation of the system for fully automating the data collection, inspection, assessment, and reporting of damage claims to rail equipment. …

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