Academic journal article Childhood Education

Children in Poverty: Trends, Consequences, and Policy Options

Academic journal article Childhood Education

Children in Poverty: Trends, Consequences, and Policy Options

Article excerpt

CHILDREN IN POVERTY: Trends, Consequences, and Policy Options. Moore, K. A., Redd, Z., Burkhauser, M. A, Mbwana, K., & Collins, A. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 2009. 12 pp. As the poverty rate for children in the United States has risen significantly, it is important to note the reality behind the numbers. Poverty afflicts minority children, especially those who are black and Hispanic, at a higher rate than it does their peers. Children of single parents, especially women, and immigrant children also have a higher probability of living in poverty.

The consequences of children living in poverty tend to be long-term and consistent. Aside from poorer achievement on standardized tests, children from impoverished homes face a higher level of stress, thus affecting memory and performance. They typically attend schools that are struggling to attract and retain skilled teachers or implement rigorous curriculum. In such communities, due to a lack of resources, poor social and health-related behaviors are common.

Specific behavioral characteristics have been found to manifest in children who have experienced both short-term and long-term poverty. Children whose parents are dealing with the ongoing results of poverty have less supervision and more constant distress in their lives. Family structure and stability tends to change more frequently. …

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