Academic journal article The Journal of Southern History

Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World

Academic journal article The Journal of Southern History

Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World

Article excerpt

Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World. Edited by John D. Garrigus and Christopher Morris. Introduction by Franklin W. Knight. The Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures, No. 41. (College Station: Published by Texas A&M University Press for the University of Texas at Arlington, 2010. Pp. [xii], 152. $29.95, ISBN 978-1-60344-192-6.) Race is an unscientific concept, and its frequent companion, slavery, has permeable boundaries. The five essays in this book examine both race and slavery in the transatlantic world, from seventeenth-century Virginia to nineteenth-century Brazil. Franklin W. Knight's introduction argues that the United States has an "unusual fixation on race"--even today (p. 11). Rebecca Goetz finds that in Virginia, after a 1667 law declared that baptism for slaves and servants did not translate into freedom, colonists nevertheless found ways to justify the denial of that sacrament to Africans and Indians. Rebecca J. Scott and Jean M. Hebrard follow a newly freed slave named Rosalie from revolutionary Haiti in 1803, to Cuba, then back to Haiti, and finally to New Orleans in 1836. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.